NEWS
L'ufficio ricerche sulle questioni istituzionali, sulla giustizia e sulla cultura del Senato della Repubblica ha redatto un dossier sui disegni di legge presentati sul tema dell'attività di lobbying. Il dossier presenta una comparazione tra i disegni di legge in esame (al 15 settembre 2014) presso la Commissione Affari costituzionali del Senato (AA.SS. nn. 281, 358, 643, 806, 992, 1497 e 1522). Manca il ddl 1191 che è stato assegnato alla Commissione Affari Costituzionali solo il 26 settembre, anche se in ogni caso la Commissione - attraverso il lavoro del relatore, Sen. Francesco Campanella (Gruppo Misto, ex 5 Stelle) appare orientata ad usa il ddl 1497 come testo base. Ad oggi le proposte presentate non sono mai state discusse, e la Commissione sta semplicemente accorpando  i testi con il medesimo argomento. Scarica il documento del Servizio Studi del Senato Interessante l'analisi dei testi a fronte, in particolare in relazione alle varie definizioni e caratteristiche: chi sono i rappresentanti di interessi particolari, cos'è l'attività di lobbying e di relazioni istituzionali (termini usati solo dal ddl 806), l'esclusione dall'applicazione della legge dei sindacati anche se fuori dalle procedure di concertazione (tutti), dei giornalisti (ddl 992), l'istituzione di autorità differenti o assegnazione del registo alla CIVIT o all'AGCM, l'impegno a rispettare un codice deontologico, l'obbligo di consultazione (solo i ddl 1497 e 643), previsione di sanzioni.

Documenti

Il modello americano di finanziamento alla politica contrapposto a quello italiano, l’importanza della trasparenza e il ruolo del lobbying. Una “lezione di democrazia” di Tony Podesta, keynote speaker dell’incontro organizzato da Ferpi in occasione dell’Assemblea romana. di Tony Podesta - Scarica la versione pdf Thank you for inviting me here at this extraordinary time for Italy and for Europe. Italy has a new government. Of course, Italy has had about a government a year since 1948. But this time is different. The Renzi government’s mandate can be summed up in one word: “change”. Remembering that President Obama’s campaign slogan in 2008 was “Hope and Change,” I know how powerful that word can be. Change isn’t easy. Not in the United States. And not in Italy. As you know, this isn’t the first time that the Italian people have demanded change, and the political system has tried to respond. In the early ‘90s, the “Clean Hands” inquiries triggered a political upheaval. Traditional parties disappeared. The electoral system was overhauled. New leaders emerged. The “Second Republic” was born. Since then, governments have lasted somewhat longer, and governance became more important than ideology. While the political earthquake of the ‘90s was triggered by corruption, the central issue today is how effectively public money is spent. Inevitably, public financing of political campaigns is coming under fire. Why should the taxpayers be subsidizing political campaigns? But, if these campaigns depend completely on private donors, how can we keep the special interests from controlling politics and policymaking? Americans have been struggling with these questions for four decades or more. I can’t offer easy answers. But I can share our experience with campaign finance reform. Big Point The American experience was summed up by two Justices of the US Supreme Court — Sandra Day O’Connor and John Paul Stevens. As they wrote in a decision upholding a campaign finance reform law: “Money, like water, will always find an outlet.” In a modern, democratic country such as the United States – or Italy – the government makes important decisions. People and organizations of all kinds will try to spend money to elect the officials who make these decisions. And their money, like water, will always find an outlet. Looking back over the last four decades, campaign finance reform has followed the same pattern, over and over again. When the American people believe that campaign funding and spending has become an intolerable scandal, reforms are enacted. But then these reforms are, if you’ll forgive my using that word again, watered down. And then, there are new reasons for Congress to enact new reforms. In short, campaign finance reform laws end up exemplifying another law: “the law of unintended consequences.” No initiative ever turns out as originally planned. This is something you should remember as you reform your political system. Good intentions do not necessarily translate into good results, especially when money meets politics. Watergate and Reform For most of American history, campaign finance was like the Wild West – without a sheriff. As recently as the 1960s and 70s, Herman Talmadge, a Democratic Senator from Georgia used to collect cash contributions from his supporters and keep the money in a large inside pocket of his overcoat. In 1979, the Senate Ethics Committee investigated his use of campaign money. In his memoirs, published in 1987, Talmadge wrote, “I wish I’d burned that damned overcoat.” And then came Watergate. Watergate wasn’t just a burglary and a cover-up. It was a financing scandal. “Deep Throat” — the FBI official who gave the journalist Bob Woodward important tips to uncover the scandal – famously advised him, “Follow the money.” The money trail showed that the Watergate break-in and, later, the “hush money” were financed with secret campaign contributions. In 1974, in the wake of Watergate, Congress passed amendments to bolster a relatively weak law enacted two years earlier. The 1974 amendments were the strongest and widest-ranging campaign finance reforms in American history to that point. These amendments restricted the influence of wealthy individuals by limiting the dollar amounts for individual donations to candidates for President and Congress. And they provided public financing of presidential campaigns, together with spending limits for candidates accepting public financing; Unintended Consequences: The Growth of PACs But political money, like water, will find an outlet. By restricting the amount of money individuals could contribute directly to congressional campaigns, the campaign finance reform had an unintended consequence: the growth of the Political Action Committees. PACs pool campaign contributions from their members and donate these funds to campaigns. Most PACs are sponsored by corporations, trade associations, and labor unions. Because PACs have higher contribution limits than individual donors, political money went to the PACs, not directly to the candidates. Currently, about 4,000 PACs contribute money to campaigns for federal office and they account for about 23 percent of all contributions to candidates for the US House and Senate. Equating Campaign Spending with Free Speech Almost as soon as campaign finance reforms were put in place, they were challenged from the political right and left. New York Senator James Buckley, a conservative Republican, and former Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy, a liberal Democrat, filed a lawsuit claiming the law was unconstitutional. In its decision, the Supreme Court ruled that limiting spending by candidates, their committees and independent expenditures imposed “direct and substantial restraints on the quantity of political speech.” This ruling established the idea that money equals speech, protected under our First Amendment. That idea that has since been used to weaken other restrictions on campaign contributions and spending. Another Unintended Consequence: Soft Money = More Spending After 1976, political campaigns became increasingly dependent on “soft money”: money without a specific purpose given to political parties. Because this money wasn’t directly used to support a specific federal candidate, it wasn’t regulated. Overall, total presidential campaign spending increased from $66.9 million in 1976 to $343.1 million in 2000. A New Campaign Finance Reform: McCain-Feingold Once again, there was a growing public demand for campaign finance reform. The next major law co-sponsored by Sen. Russ Feingold, a Wisconsin Democrat, and Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican, was enacted in 2002. The law, known as McCain-Feingold: Banned national political party committees from soliciting or spending “soft money”; and Barred issue ads mentioning a candidate’s name — known as electioneering — that were financed by corporate or union money within 60 days of a general election. Once again, political money, like water, found an outlet. Activity in tax-exempt nonprofit groups outside the parties increased, because their spending wasn’t regulated. Weakening Campaign Finance Reform: Citizens United and other Court Decisions And, once again, the Supreme Court watered down campaign finance reform. In 2007, the Supreme Court struck down McCain-Feingold’s ban on issue ads that did not expressly support election or defeat of a candidate. In 2010, in Citizens United v. FEC, the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected independent expenditures of corporations and unions and allowed them to advocate for or against candidates, such as funding political ads within 60 days of an election. While still not allowed to contribute directly to federal candidates and national party committees, corporations can now fund political activity and advocacy from their treasuries. Russ Feingold lost his Senate seat in 2010 to Republican Ron Johnson, who did not bind himself to the limits on campaign spending that Feingold imposed on himself. And John McCain lost the Republican presidential nomination in 2000 to George W. Bush and the presidency in 2008 to Barack Obama. Unlike McCain, Bush and Obama refused public financing and spending limits. Unintended Consequence: The Growth of Super PACs The Citizens United ruling gave rise to Super PACs. Super PACs can raise unlimited money from individuals, corporations or unions and can expressly advocate for a candidate. While Super PACs aren’t supposed to coordinate with candidates or their campaigns, former campaign staff frequently run PACs that generally support that candidate. Partly because of Super PACs, campaign spending in the 2012 presidential election reached unprecedented levels. Super PACs also extended the Republican primary season by keeping candidates such as former Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum in the race long after Mitt Romney had become the clear frontrunner. Weakening Campaign Finance Reform: Wealthy Donors Can Give More Money Meanwhile, it’s harder and harder to build barriers against political money. On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court struck down aggregate limits on how much an individual can contribute in a two-year period to all federal candidates, parties, and political action committees, combined. While individuals are still limited in how much they can give to any single candidate or party directly for each election, now an individual can give the maximum allowed contribution amount to each and every candidate. This decision was widely reported as benefiting large donors who can give more money than before. But some of us may not appreciate that we can no longer tell fundraisers, “Sorry, but I’m maxed out.” Public Financing Declines In the US as in Italy, public financing of political parties is declining. 2012 was the first presidential election since President Nixon’s re-election in 1972 when neither major party candidate accepted public financing and the spending limits that come with it. Instead, spending by the presidential campaigns topped $2 billion (Obama, $1.123 billion; Romney $1.019 billion). On top of that, Super PACS supporting Romney spent $292 million, and Super PACS supporting Obama spent $258 million. With the growth of Super PACs – and with President Obama creating an independent apparatus — the formal party organizations are relatively less important. Instead, independent organizations are setting the agenda for the national debate. Disclosure Requirements for Lobbyists Now you may be wondering, what about lobbyists? Unlike campaign finance, where the water has to find a new outlet, there are no limits on the amount spent on lobbying. Corporations, organizations, and individuals can spend as much—or as little, unfortunately — as they want on lobbying activities. Total spending on lobbying has more than doubled in the past 15 years, from $1.46 billion in 1998 to $3.23 billion in 2013—-and that’s down from $3.55 billion in 2010. Lobbying Disclosure Act As with campaign finance, lobbyists must register and must disclose their spending and activities. For many years, lobbying registration was lax and infrequently observed. In 1995, Congress passed the Lobbying Disclosure Act, requiring lobbyists to file reports twice a year to be disclosed publicly and with the Congress. These include: Estimates of their income and spending; The names of individuals, agencies and houses of Congress lobbied; And issues lobbied to be disclosed publicly with the Congress. As we’ve seen before, scandal begets reform. After the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandals of 2006, Congress strengthened the Lobbying Disclosure Act to require disclosure every three months, also including: Previous government positions; Federal campaign contributions and donations benefiting government officials And more stringent criminal penalties for noncompliance. Foreign Agents Registration Act For lobbyists representing foreign governments, the disclosure requirements are even more stringent. Enacted in 1937 to combat Nazi sympathizers, the Foreign Agents Registration Act requires private individuals advising or representing a foreign government or political party before the US government or public to register with the US Department of Justice. “Agents” must disclose their home address, year of birth, country of citizenship, all political contributions, the US officials or media they contacted and the topics they discussed, as well as how much they earned and how much they spent on behalf of a foreign client. Also, any “informational materials” disseminated broadly must be submitted to the Department of Justice within 2 days. Lessons for Italy So what does this all mean for Italy? Here in Italy, the strongest demand for change comes from the people themselves. The combination of top-down awareness and bottom-up expectations creates a rare opportunity. The inevitable nexus between politics and money – which Rome has known for 2,500 years – is coming under strict scrutiny. People want to know: where the money comes from; who gets the money; and how they spend it. Regulation of campaign financing should be clear, understandable and, above all, enforceable. It should create a system of transparency and accountability, not rigid limitations that would not be respected anyway. Otherwise – and this is the lesson to be drawn from the American experience – the law of unintended consequences will inexorably kick in. Political money, like water, will find an outlet. But we need to regulate the flow of funds so they do not drown our democracies. Fonte: Ferpi

Documenti

Gli economisti Marianne Bertrand e Luigi Zingales discutono di interessi particolari, finanziamento della politica e "regulatory capture". Vai al video del dibattito organizzato dalla Chicago Booth. Ecco chi è Luigi Zingales Nel 2012 la rivista "Foreign policy" lo ha indicato (unico italiano insieme al presidente della Bce Mario Draghi) tra i 100 pensatori più influenti al mondo. Luigi Zingales, 50 anni, è l'uomo che ha "rovinato" il leader di Fare per fermare il declino Oscar Giannino. Lui stesso tra i primi ad aver aderito al movimento politico, ha lasciato ieri accusando Giannino di essersi inventato nel suo curriculum un master in business administration alla Chicago Booth University. Economista e accademico, Zingales in quella università americana è professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance. Laureato in economia alla Bocconi nel 1987, ha poi ottenuto un dottorato sempre in economia al celebre Mit, il Massachussetts Institute of Technology. Editorialista per il Sole 24 Ore, siede come amministratore indipendente nel consiglio di amministrazione di Telecom Italia. Nell'estate del 2012 è stato tra i fondatori, insieme ad Oscar Giannino e ad altri economisti, di Fermare il Declino, partecipando alla campagna elettorale senza però candidarsi in prima persona per via di impegni accademici precedentemente sottoscritti. Scarica il paper di Luigi Zingales "Preventing Economists’ Capture" in .pdf  

Documenti

E con il via libera arrivato ieri da parte della Camera dei Lords alla "Lobbying Bill" proposta dal Primo Ministro britannico David Cameron, sono ora 26 i paesi al mondo (di cui 10 europei), oltre all'Unione Europea, ad avere norme che regolano l'attività di lobbying. Quello delle normative sul lobbying è un processo che parte da lontano, e che vede la sua prima vera affermazione negli USA col "Federal Regulation of Lobbying Act" del 1946 (sostituito nel 1995 dal "Lobbying Disclosure Act" e dalle successive modifiche volute anche dal presidente Obama con l'Honest Leadership Act). Ma, in particolare a partire dagli anni 2000, anche l'Europa ha iniziato a marciare verso lo stesso obiettivo, sotto la spinta di una richiesta da parte di cittadini, imprese e organizzazioni internazionali (con OCSE e ONU in prima fila) di una sempre maggior trasparenza della politica. E gli stessi lobbisti, contrariamente ad un'errata opinione comune, sono assolutamente favorevoli (come dimostrato da un sondaggio dell'OCSE del 2009) ad una regolamentazione del settore, che garantirebbe loro certezza del diritto per la loro attività e una legittimità che certamente aiuterebbe anche l'aspetto business. La situazione italiana sul tema è purtroppo nota. Circa 50 progetti di legge e un ddl del Governo Prodi tra il 1976 ed oggi hanno portato al nulla di fatto. Il presidente del Consiglio Enrico Letta più volte si speso in favore di una legislazione adeguata, ma uno scontro tra i Ministri Quagliarello e D'Alia - interventi con due progetti contrastanti -  e la forte opposizione dell'ex Ministro De Girolamo (che paventò addirittura un "ritorno all'Unione Sovietica") in Consiglio dei Ministri lo scorso luglio, ha fatto finire tutto in un mandato al Ministro delle Politiche UE, Moavero Milanesi "di fare un esame comparato con i principali paesi europei". Essendo ormai passati sei mesi, e dopo un ulteriore intervento televisivo del presidente Letta poche sere fa, come aiuto al Governo abbiamo pensato potesse essere utile rendere noto l'esame comparato che il Governo (ufficialmente, è chiaro) non ha ancora realizzato. Ecco quindi di seguito un quadro delle norme esistenti sul lobbying nei vari stati dell'Unione Europea ed europei in generale. Le normative sul lobbying in Europa Il primo paese a normare l'attività di lobbying è stata la Germania, il cui registro risale addirittura al 1951, istituzionalizzato poi nel settembre 1972. Il registro è volontario, e non è designato come un registro dei lobbisti di per se. Infatti, è primariamente un sistema che regola l'accesso agli edifici parlamentari. Inoltre, include solo organizzazioni e non individui, non include informazioni finanziarie sulle risorse impegnate, mentre invece impone  di comunicare soggetti rappresentati e le questioni su cui l'organizzazione lavora. La norma riflette la tradizionale cultura tedesca del coinvolgimento delle organizzazioni di rappresentanza (principalmente dell'industria e i sindacati) e delle fondazioni nel sistema decisionale pubblico. Sono di conseguenza assenti dal registro le società di lobbying. Al 24 gennaio 2014 erano 2148 le organizzazioni registrate. La Germania inoltre presenta dei registri anche a livello di lander. Brandenburgo e Renania-Palatinato ne hanno istituito uno nel 2012, mentre Berlino e l'Assia dovrebbero averne uno a breve. L'Austria è il paese con la regolamentazione più recente. Nel 2012 ha adottato un stringente regolamentazione dell'attività di lobbying con una norma denominata "Lobbying- und Interessenvertretungs-Transparenz-Gesetz" (Legge sulla trasparenza di lobbying e rappresentanza di interessi". Il Bundestag austriaco ha approvato una norm che impone un registro obbligatorio per tutti coloro che ricevono un compenso per attività mirate ad influenzare la legislazione o le politiche pubbliche. L'obbligo riguarda anche le organizzazioni di rappresentanza . Tra i dati da includere nel Lobbying- und Interessenvertretungs-Register, gestito dal Ministero della Giustizia, sono inclusi: l'identità del lobbista, i clienti, le questioni su cui il lobbista lavora e i contatti con i funzionari pubblici (Ministri, parlamentari, dirigenti della PA). La gran parte di questi dati è disponibile al pubblico via web. Inoltre, i lobbisti debbono impegnarsi a rispettare un Codice di Condotta incluso nella norma generale, la cui violazione può portare alla sospensione dal registro e quindi dalla possibilità di esercitare l'attività. La norma è in vigore dall'1 gennaio 2013. Al 29 gennaio 2014 risultano essere 231 i lobbisti o le organizzazioni iscritte al Registro austriaco. Sempre nel 2012, nel mese di luglio, la Tweede Kamer der Staten-Generaal, la Camera Alta del Parlamento d'Olanda ha introdotto con un proprio atto un Lobbyistenregister che prevede un sistema di accessi (uno per organizzazione) alla Camera. Il Registro distingue tre categorie di lobbisti: rappresentanti di società di consulenza di PR o public affairs; i lobbisti delle associazioni di rappresentanza, e quelli delle municipalità e delle province. Al 13 gennaio 2014 erano 78 i lobbisti rappresentanti di società o organizzazioni iscritti nel Registro olandese, che prevede una disclosure limitata di informazioni, ma aiuta a regolamentare l'accesso, tema assai sentito da parte di istituzioni e lobbisti. Anche la Francia presenta una regolamentazione assai leggera a seguito dell'istituzione di un Registro dei lobbisti presso l'Assemblee national e il Senat. Come in Olanda, la registrazione consente ai lobbisti un accesso diretto alle sedi delle due camere, Palais Bourbon e a Palais du Luxembourg. A seguito di recenti aggiustamenti (il rapporto Sirigue del marzo 2013), le informazioni contenute nel registro sono molto più abbondanti: oltre ai nomi dei lobbisti debbono infatti essere rese note le risorse assegnate da una particolare società o ONG; le società di consulenza sono invitate a fornire i nomi dei loro clienti e le ONG le fonti delle donazioni e sovvenzioni. Inoltre, ci sono più filtri prima dell'iscrizione (che può essere respinta), è stato limitato l'accesso ad alcune aree mentre è stata data la possibilità ai lobbisti registrati di ricevere degli alert o inviare contributi sulle norme. Le relazioni individuali tra parlamentari e lobbisti non sono condizionate dall'inclusione di quest'ultimi nel registro (sarebbe incidere sulla libertà dei parlamentari). E' previsto un Codice di Condotta. Al 28 gennaio 2014 risultano essere 237 i lobbisti registrati. Più limitato è invece il registro del Senato. Rimane infine il buco nero dei rapporti tra lobbisti e Governo. E' possibile che però presto venga istituito un registro unico presso l'Haute Autorité pour la transparence de la vie publique che ha come mission anche quella di dare indicazioni sui rapporti tra lobbisti e amministrazione pubblica. L'Europa dell'Est avanza Diversa è la situazione dei paesi dell'ex blocco sovietico, dove più si è sviluppata una regolamentazione dell'attività grazie alle spinte delle OCSE a supporto del processo di democratizzazione, anche se principalmente in un'ottica di politiche anticorruzione. La Lituania è stato il primo paese dell'Est ad adottare una legge sull'attività di lobbying il 27 giugno 2000 (entrata in vigore l'1 gennaio 2001).  La legge determina cos'è l'attività di lobbying, un lobbista (inteso solo come il consulente) e il suo cliente; prevede il controllo sulle informazioni fornite e una serie di sanzioni per la violazione della norma. La legge definisce attività di lobbying quella condotta dietro compenso mirata ad influenzare l'adozione, la modifica, l'integrazione o l'abrogazione di atti normativi. La legge è stata però scarsamente applicata, e ciò perché le ONG e altri soggetti hanno rifiutato di essere integrati, anche per un processo culturale che deriva dal ricordo del regime sovietico che tendeva ad inquadrare nel sistema e schiacciare ogni rappresentanza della società civile. La Polonia ha approvato una norma che regola l'attività di lobbying e impone un registro obbligatorio nel 2005.   Tra i principali elementi della norma la definizione di "attività di lobbying" e il tipo di lobbisti (come la Lituania, la norma si applica ai soli consulenti), le procedure di registrazione e la tarsparenza, e le sanzioni in caso di violazione della norma. Una particolarità della norma polacca è che impone ai funzionari governativo di mantenere un registro dei contatti coi lobbisti da rendere pubblico annualmente. La norma, nata in un'ottica restrittiva ha però nel tempo subito delle modifiche ispirate alla promozione del buon governo e della trasparenza dell'iter legislativo. Un punto importante infatti è che  il Governo ogni sei mesi deve pubblicare il programma del lavoro legislativo e i termini per chiudere la discussione sulle bozze normative, inoltre vengono date indicazioni agli uffici su come cooperare al meglio coi lobbisti, cui deve essere garantito accesso e spazi riservati. Al riguardo il parlamento polacco è intervenuto modificando i suoi regolamenti dando anche delle specifiche sulla gestione delle audizioni. Nel 2006 è stata la volta dell'Ungheria ad emanare una legge sul modello UE che istituiva un registro dei lobbisti volontario, abrogata poi nel 2011 dal governo Orban, in quanto la norma "non coincideva con i costumi e le procedure ungheresi" e non veniva percepita come necessaria (col risultato di scarse iscrizioni). Nel febbraio 2013 però il governo ha inserito una serie di regole sui rapporti tra funzionari pubblici e lobbisti all'interno di un sistema generale di norme anticorruzione e trasprenza. Dopo Israele nel 2008, che dovrebbe rivedere la norma nel suo complesso nei prossimi mesi, nel 2010 è arrivata la legge sul lobbying della Slovenia. Questa è stata inserita all'interno delle misure anticorruzione nel quadro di un programma finalizzato al rafforzamento della trasparenza del sistema. La norma prevede un Registro obbligatorio che richiede di fornire: nome e indirizzo dei lobbisti; i loro clienti; i compensi ricevuti; i finanziamenti dati ai partiti politici; le questioni su cui fanno lobbying; gli uffici contattati. Tutte le informazioni sono rese pubbliche via web e sono sottoposte al controllo della Commissione per la prevenzione della corruzione. Come in Polonia, c'è un obbligo per i funzionari governativi di rendicontare i contatti coi lobbisti, anche se nel primo anno di applicazione della norma quest'ultimo aspetto non ha ricevuto adeguato rispetto (anche per mancanza di sanzioni specifiche). Gli altri paesi che vedono in vigore normative sul lobbying sono Macedonia, Montenegro e Georgia (inclusa come Israele, essendo la lista dei paesi che fanno parte dell'UEFA l'unico concetto alternativo reale di Europa alternativo a quello dell'UE!). E non va dimenticato che nel resto del mondo, accanto a paesi come Canada e Australia (che vedono un registro anche per gran parte delle rispettive province e stati), c'è una lunga serie di nazioni che hanno deciso di regolare in maniera più o meno adeguata l'attività di lobbying. L'ultimo della lista è il Cile, che ha approvato la norma la scorsa settimana dopo un dibattito decennale, ma prima di esso ci sono stati Messico, Colombia, Argentina e Perù. In Asia addirittura le Filippine dagli anni '50 e Taiwan dal 2008 hanno una norma, mentre in India la discussione è stata avviata, come anche in Nigeria. Le norme a venire nel 2014 Ma non è finita qui. Molto probabilmente Irlanda, Spagna, Bulgaria, Romania e forse persino Ucraina potrebbero avere una normativa ad hoc entro il 2014, mentre l'Italia rimane con le sue tre, inutili ed inapplicate, norme a livello regionale (Toscana, la sua copia Molise e Abruzzo) e forse con il Registro dei rappresentanti di interessi presso il MIPAAF, che forse si salverà, dopo essere stato abbandonato, a seguito delle dimissioni del Ministro De Girolamo, acerrima nemica di ogni regolamentazione delle lobbies (anche se nella scorsa legislatura fu prima firmataria di un ddl di "Disciplina dell’attività di relazione istituzionale") A questo punto il Ministro Moavero ha a disposizione un quadro delle norme esistente (anche se ci piacerebbe leggere quello preparatogli dai suoi uffici), di conseguenza si attende il prossimo passo al riguardo da parte del presidente Letta. Un passo che auspichiamo possa dare seguito alla recente dichiarazione a Lilli Gruber nella sua trasmissione 8 e 1/2 e, ancor di più, agli anni di lavoro portati avanti da VeDrò, il "suo" think net" ormai purtroppo abbandonato.

Documenti

L’accountability di singoli e istituzioni trova il proprio fondamento nella trasparenza, che non è solo mezzo e al contempo fine, ma altresì metodo di svolgimento di ogni attività che abbia pubblica rilevanza. I soggetti che in qualunque ruolo devono rendere conto del proprio operato sono oggi chiamati ad agire secondo modalità idonee a consentire che i propri comportamenti siano pubblicamente verificati e, comunque, giudicati. In questo modo, la loro responsabilità viene sostanziata mediante il controllo che qualunque interessato può operare sui fini perseguiti, sulle motivazioni che ne sono alla base, sulle valutazioni compiute, sugli obiettivi raggiunti e sulle cause di eventuali scostamenti da quelli inizialmente previsti. Il suddetto controllo può essere, dunque, effettuato solo laddove funzioni istituzionali che richiedono l’utilizzo di pubbliche risorse vengano espletate secondo procedimenti che trovino nella trasparenza il proprio connotato. Di tale principio nelle sue più varie accezioni si è più volte scritto: giova evidenziarne il “filo rosso”. La posizione di inaccessibilità di cui lo Stato ha sempre goduto rispetto ai soggetti amministrati – collocati in una situazione di sudditanza, per molti versi ancora presente – va da anni gradatamente sfumando. A partire dal 1990 (L. n. 241), la legge ha ammesso che la “casa di vetro” dell’Amministrazione cominciasse a essere illuminata, permettendo al singolo soggetto di accedere agli atti di un procedimento pubblico di cui egli fosse parte in causa. La trasparenza, nonostante le buone intenzioni che inizialmente ne hanno lastricato la strada, non è stata mai compiutamente attuata. A essa da ultimo è stato dedicato un provvedimento (il decreto c.d. “Trasparenza”, d.lgs. n. 33/2013, qui se ne è scritto) che, smentendo l’intitolazione, crea opacità per confusione alla collettività destinataria di informazioni di non agevole fruizione (nonché complicazioni operative a chi sia tenuto ad applicarlo). E’ stata così ottenuta non la disclosure annunciata, bensì una burocrazia digitalizzata. Peraltro, il decreto citato non è il Foia (Freedom of Information Act); la trasparenza non è “reattiva”, cioè non si concretizza nell’obbligo di assolvere a precise istanze informative avanzate da parte di soggetti interessati, ma viene realizzata solo se proattivamente prevista ovvero qualora qualche amministrazione decida di aprire il forziere della conoscenza di questo o quel dato che la riguardi; in Italia il “rendere conto” non connota spontaneamente lo stile delle istituzioni, come dovrebbe invece avvenire in un Paese evoluto. Gli open data, anch’essi strumento di trasparenza (openness), nonché miniera di elementi da elaborare in funzione dell’innovazione tecnologica, della crescita imprenditoriale e quindi anche del Paese, restano spesso più un auspicio che un “dato” effettivo (come qui si spiega). Per altro verso, anche l’Agenda digitale, che dovrebbe consentire efficienza alla P.A. e risparmi allo Stato, per molti profili è ancora irrealizzata: l’intrico di competenze e decreti finalizzati ad attuarla ne sanciscono, di fatto, lo stallo (come qui si dimostra). Dal settore amministrativo l’esigenza di trasparenza si è progressivamente estesa a quello normativo, al fine di conferire all’attività di rule making l’evidenza pubblica necessaria per ogni procedimento avente a oggetto gli interessi dei cittadini (come qui si è visto). La “qualità della regolamentazione”, strumento di semplificazione e dunque di efficienza, è a tutt’oggi un mero auspicio, mentre in ambito europeo continuano le iniziative volte a perseguirla (in materia di semplificazioni, da ultimo, ottobre 2013). La sempre maggiore complessità e numerosità degli interessi da considerare nell’attività di produzione normativa evidenzia l’esigenza di una trasparenza ancora più ampia, affinché la collettività destinataria delle leggi possa verificare l’agire del pubblico decisore e le valutazioni da parte di quest’ultimo poste alla base delle sue scelte. Poiché non vi è controllo che non abbia a oggetto il procedimento seguito e le motivazioni su cui si basano le decisioni assunte, risulta necessario che il legislatore adotti la trasparenza quale metodo operativo: funzionali a ciò risultano l’analisi e la verifica di impatto (AIR e VIR), che si basano sulla misurazione degli oneri amministrativi (MOA). Gli strumenti citati trovano momento importante nelle consultazioni pubbliche che, preventivamente all’emanazione dell’atto di legge, consentono di portare a conoscenza del pubblico decisore ogni elemento essenziale della materia da disciplinare, affinché egli possa valutare l’impatto delle disposizioni sui portatori degli interessi rappresentati. Dunque, in sede di consultazioni, detti interessi vengono messi a confronto sulla base dell’opera di esposizione e valorizzazione svolta da parte di sappia adeguatamente spiegarli: è poi compito del legislatore quello di compararli, decidere quale soddisfare o cercare comunque una mediazione, dando poi chiara ed evidente descrizione del proprio operato mediante i documenti a ciò finalizzati. Da quanto fin qui esposto e in forza del più volte richiamato criterio di trasparenza, ci si aspetterebbe che l’attività dei c.d. gruppi di pressione, quali interlocutori delle istituzioni affinché a specifici interessi sia riconosciuta rilevanza in forza dell’attività da essi svolta, trovasse nel nostro ordinamento ambiente normativo idoneo a far sì che essa avvenga secondo criteri di chiarezza, correttezza e pubblica evidenza. Invece, in Italia già solo il termine “lobbisti”, usato per indicare chi intenda esercitare un qualche ruolo attivo – dall’informazione, alla persuasione, all’influenza alla pressione – nei riguardi pubblico decisore, evoca pratiche truffaldine, corruzione, malaffare, clientelismo e, in ogni caso, fini illegali. Pare che J. F. Kennedy dicesse che un “lobbista” gli consentiva di capire in dieci minuti questioni che i suoi assistenti gli avrebbero spiegato in tre giorni e in decine di fogli. Ciò sintetizza l’importanza che lobby regolamentate come strumenti di comunicazione dinamica ed efficace di istanze diverse potrebbero rivestire per un miglior funzionamento delle istituzioni, per l’efficienza nell’intero sistema e per la democrazia stessa, che nella rappresentanza degli interessi della collettività si sostanzia e che nella trasparenza dei metodi per soddisfarli trova la manifestazione più compiuta. Giova rammentare che la trasparenza è stata sancita quale principio di funzionamento delle istituzioni comunitarie, nonché quale strumento per avvicinare le istituzioni stesse ai cittadini, con il trattato di Amsterdam (art. 1, comma 2 TUE), in vigore dal 1999. Nel Libro Bianco sulla governance europea (2001), poi, la UE ha affrontato temi dei quali la trasparenza rappresenta espressione: tra questi, l’accesso a documenti istituzionali e a informazioni sui consulenti di cui la Commissione si avvale, la consultazione delle parti interessate e la valutazione d’impatto prima della presentazione delle proposte legislative, ciò per “garantire che si tenga debitamente conto delle esigenze dei cittadini e di tutte le parti interessate”. Il fine che si è inteso perseguire è quello di offrire a queste ultime “un canale strutturato per le loro reazioni, critiche e proteste”, “rafforzare la cultura della consultazione e del dialogo” e in questo modo, mediante processi che in quanto pubblici e condivisi sono per definizione anche più trasparenti, pervenire a una maggiore “responsabilizzazione di tutte le parti in causa” (come chiarito altresì nella successiva comunicazione contenente “Principi generali e requisiti minimi per la consultazione delle parti interessate” del 2002, oltre che nel Libro verde di cui in appresso). Nel 2005, poi, la Commissione ha avviato un’analisi della sua strategia generale in materia di trasparenza (c.d. Iniziativa Europea per la Trasparenza), comprendente tra l’altro “la gestione delle attività dei gruppi di interesse e delle organizzazioni della società civile”. Nell’ambito di detta iniziativa, ha adottato il Libro verde  (2006) al fine di “identificare i settori suscettibili di miglioramenti e stimolare un dibattito su tali settori”: tra questi, la definizione di “le attività dei rappresentanti dei gruppi di interesse (lobbisti)” e i “feedback sui requisiti minimi in materia di consultazione” che “contribuiscono a garantire una interazione trasparente tra i rappresentanti dei gruppi di interesse e la Commissione”. Peraltro, nel Libro Verde si ribadisce l’importanza di un “alto grado di trasparenza per garantire che l’Unione sia aperta a un controllo pubblico e renda conto del proprio operato”. In tale prospettiva, appare evidente come il “lobbismo” vale a dire “tutte le attività svolte al fine di influenzare l’elaborazione delle politiche e il processo decisionale delle istituzioni europee” non potesse non costituire oggetto di considerazione in un ambito, quello europeo, ove i benefici derivanti da istituzioni e attività trasparenti sono stati percepiti con molto anticipo rispetto al nostro Paese. La regolamentazione delle lobby è minimale e volontaria: si sostanzia nell’iscrizione a un registro (dal 2011 comune tra Commissione e Parlamento) che ha lo scopo di far conoscere ai cittadini le organizzazioni, le persone giuridiche e i lavoratori autonomi le cui attività possono avere incidenza sui processi decisionali dell’Unione europea. Il registro contiene informazioni riguardanti il tipo di attività, gli interessi perseguiti e le risorse destinate alle proprie attività da parte di detti soggetti. Essi sono tenuti all’osservanza di un codice di condotta, recante generici obblighi di comportamento (che, a propria volta, si integrano con le regole riguardati i funzionari europei, volte al fine di scongiurare pericoli di corruzione o imparzialità nello svolgimento dei propri compiti), per la cui violazione sono previste sanzioni che tuttavia, a detta degli interessati (si veda la ricerca Ocse di seguito citata), non vengono effettivamente irrogate. L’attività di lobbying in Europa è stata oggetto di ricerche pubblicate di recente (Burson-Marsteller, Alter-EU e OCSE). Nonostante talune differenze tra le percentuali, esse evidenziano l’esigenza che per l’attività stessa un incremento del livello di trasparenza. Perché la trasparenza è l’elemento che conferisce all’attività di cui si sta trattando un effettivo valore aggiunto, come si vedrà in appresso.   Fonte: Vitalba Azzollini - Leoni Blog

Documenti

Non sono tanto le leggi o i ‘lacci’ ai donatori che creano un sistema politico sano. Quello che fa la differenza nella qualità del processo di policy making è la forza vincolante dei watchdog. La proposta di iniziativa governativa di abolire il finanziamento pubblico diretto dei partiti ha nuovamente acceso i timori circa l’influenza degli interessi particolari sugli eletti, riaprendo un dibattito non particolarmente originale sui contributi privati all’attività dei partiti. Nel focus “Investire in democrazia. Finanziamento alla politica, lobby e trasparenza” (PDF), Paolo Zanetto, fellow onorario dell’Istituto Bruno Leoni - ricorda che “non sono tanto le leggi o i ‘lacci’ ai donatori che creano un sistema politico sano – una bustarella in contanti sarà sempre data al di fuori di qualsiasi regola. Quello che fa la differenza nella qualità del processo di policy making è la forza vincolante dei watchdog.” “Ciò che manca - prosegue Zanetto - è un vero clima di trasparenza e accountability, che consenta effettivamente all’elettore di prendere atto dei rapporti economici tra politica e imprese – e di come questo influenzi le scelte degli eletti, nel processo di policy-making. I watchdog non mancano, anche in Italia. Hanno solo bisogno di strumenti”. Il Focus “Investire in democrazia. Finanziamento alla politica, lobby e trasparenza” di Palo Zanetto è liberamente disponibile qui (PDF).  

Documenti

(Tommaso Edoardo Frosini) - 1. Il tema dei gruppi di pressione – ovvero le lobbies – è cruciale per il buon funzionamento della democrazia di tipo liberale, per il semplice fatto che a esso è consustanziale la massima garanzia possibile della trasparenza del processo decisionale pubblico. Nelle democrazie pluraliste, il fenomeno di gruppi organizzati di individui che si fanno portatori di interessi particolari presso il decisore pubblico, nel tentativo di orientarne le scelte, rappresenta una realtà imprescindibile. E valga l’esempio statunitense, dove l’attività di lobbying è talmente connaturata al sistema politico-costituzionale, al punto da considerarla, come dicono gli americani, “as American as apple pie”. Peraltro, come noto, negli Usa il lobbying gode di protezione costituzionale al Primo Emendamento, quale libertà di parola per convincere il decisore pubblico (come sostenuto dalla Corte Suprema, a partire da U.S. v. Harris del 1954). Va altresì detto, che sempre più spesso il decisore pubblico ha avvertito la necessità di acquisire informazioni e conoscenze da parte di portatori di interessi particolari, e ciò soprattutto al fine di deliberare su questioni altamente tecniche o specialistiche. In tal senso, la dottrina ha evidenziato l’azione positiva esercitata dai gruppi di pressione nel processo decisionale, in quanto fornitori di elementi indispensabili per la comprensione dell’impatto di determinate scelte, sebbene molto spesso essi siano le cause di normative oscure o dalla difficile interpretazione (v. per tutti, P.L. Petrillo, Democrazie sotto pressione. Parlamenti e lobby nel diritto pubblico comparato, Milano, 2011). In molti ordinamenti tale attività di pressione – ovvero di lobbying, per usare un termine inglese – svolta da gruppi organizzati verso i decisori pubblici è sottoposta a una precisa regolamentazione volta ad assicurare la trasparenza del processo decisionale o anche la partecipazione dei gruppi di pressione (che rispettano precise regole) al processo decisionale stesso. In tali ordinamenti (Stati Uniti, Canada, Israele, Francia, Gran Bretagna, Australia, Ungheria, Polonia, Estonia, Lituania) si è avvertita, con sfumature profondamente diverse tra loro, la medesima esigenza di rendere conoscibili a tutti chi sono e quali sono i gruppi di pressione, definendo un assetto di regole volte, quanto meno, ad assicurare la trasparenza delle decisioni. Le analisi di diritto comparato evidenziano come nei sistemi in cui il Parlamento è “forte” –nel senso che gioca un ruolo chiave nei processi politici– esista una regolamentazione della rappresentanza parlamentare delle lobbies; all’opposto, al Parlamento debole corrispondono interessi oscuri. In tal senso, si è proceduto, da Petrillo nel lavoro prima ricordato, a classificare e comparare i “modelli” normativi sulle lobbies, con ricaduta in punto di forma di governo, come: “regolamentazione-trasparenza” (Gran Bretagna e Canada), “regolamentazione-partecipazione” (Usa e UE), “regolamentazione-strisciante” (Italia). Prendiamo il caso italiano, dove mancano regole organiche in materia mentre esistono delle disposizioni, “disperse” fra norme di vario genere, che in qualche modo si riferiscono ai gruppi di pressione e alla loro lecita azione di orientamento della decisione pubblica. Si pensi, per esempio, alle norme del regolamento della Camera dei deputati e del Senato della Repubblica in materia di istruttoria legislativa, ovvero alle disposizioni relative all’Analisi di impatto della regolamentazione (AIR), che impongono il coinvolgimento di soggetti privati nella redazione dell’atto normativo. Tali disposizioni, tuttavia, non hanno avuto l’effetto di rendere palese il fenomeno lobbistico, né era il loro obiettivo quasi che in Italia si fatichi ad ammettere che le lobbies esistono; e questo anche perché si è mossi dalla preoccupazione che la disciplina dei gruppi di pressione possa equivalere alla loro legittimazione, dunque una curiosa ritrosia a riconoscere che il Re è nudo. Le lobbies sono divenute, di conseguenza, un vero e proprio tabù giuridico-costituzionale, un argomento noto alle cronache giornalistiche ma ritenuto non sufficientemente degno di essere sottoposto ad analisi giuridica. Tabù che invece si vuole qui sfatare, dedicando per la parte monografica di questo numero di Percorsi proprio alle lobbies nelle varie declinazioni: come problema e soluzione nello stato contemporaneo (Guzzetta); come rappresentanza di interessi (Colavitti); nella loro dimensione europea (Ferioli e Sassi); nell’attività delle organizzazioni religiose (Macrì) e come diritto costituzionale al lobbying (Petrillo). Un’ampia carrellata di focus stranieri – Usa (Mazzone), Francia (Meny), Israele (Tal), America Latina (Pizzolo) – offre un quadro chiaro del fenomeno lobby per un inquadramento nel diritto comparato. 2. Certo, nessuno ignora il fatto che le decisioni pubbliche assunte a tutti i livelli nel nostro sistema siano comunque il frutto di una negoziazione tra interessi differenti, la cui sintesi spetta all’Autorità chiamata a formalizzare la decisione. Ugualmente è noto che all’interno della grandi società operano direzioni generali competenti proprio in materia di lobbying (o, con espressione più “pudica”, di relazioni istituzionali) e che in Italia numerose sono le società il cui scopo principale è proprio l’esercizio del lobbying per conto di terzi soggetti. Tale attività, infatti, non soltanto richiede, per essere esercitata correttamente, una specifica competenza basata su conoscenze tecniche e scientifiche, ma ha assunto una sua funzione economica-sociale. Con la crisi dei partiti politici, tradizionali mediatori degli interessi della società civile presso le istituzioni pubbliche, tale fenomeno ha assunto una dimensione maggiore, ed è sembrato configurarsi quale “succedaneo” della rappresentanza politica, se non addirittura alternativa a essa. Il punto è delicato e non posso certo trattarlo in questo breve spazio di presentazione, ma rimando senz’altro alla lettura dei contributi pubblicati in questo fascicolo, che prendono sul serio tema e problema. Credo, però, che occorra partire da questa constatazione, relativamente alla crisi dei partiti, e dal presupposto che l’attività di lobbying non solo è lecita ma è anche utile e preziosa per il decisore pubblico, perché strumento indispensabile per acquisire informazioni tecniche, altrimenti difficilmente comprensibili, e prevenire impatti economicamente e socialmente insostenibili delle decisioni che si vogliono adottare. Il lobbying opererebbe, dunque, quale infrastruttura sociale ed economica in grado di unire, fermo restando le proprie rispettive responsabilità, soggetti privati e decisori pubblici. La crisi che permea le istituzioni partitiche che erano i normali collettori di interessi collettivi, sollecita un intervento legislativo in tal senso. Non si può infatti negare che l’attività dei portatori di interessi sia sempre esistita ed esista in qualsiasi società evoluta. L’obiettivo che si deve raggiungere è quello di rendere trasparenti le attività, le finalità e gli scopi, i mezzi umani e finanziari impiegati, i gruppi che muovono tali interessi. Lo scopo, quindi, non è quello di istituire una nuova figura professionale o di imporre sui gruppi di interessi nuovi e maggiori oneri, ma quello di razionalizzare un’attività già presente ma non regolamentata, per fornire al decisore pubblico uno strumento e un supporto chiaro e con obiettivi e finalità ben definite e, al tempo stesso, garantire ai cittadini il diritto di conoscere le ragioni (non solo politiche) sottese alla decisione pubblica. Peraltro, che oggi l’esigenza di “regolare gli sregolati”, per così dire, risulti senz’altro avvertita è dimostrato e confermato anche, e forse soprattutto, dalla critiche che vengono mosse all’azione oscura, in quanto «viaggiano a fari spenti, nella notte delle regole», delle lobbies, accusate, come scrive Michele Ainis in un recente libro, di divorare l’Italia. Per poi specificare, opportunamente: «come se il lobbying fosse un’attività criminosa, e non invece un veicolo d’informazione per le assemblee legislative, nonché di partecipazione per le categorie cui si rivolge la decisione del legislatore» (M. Ainis, Privilegium. L’Italia divorata dalle lobby, Milano, 2012). E allora: resta ferma l’esigenza di legittimare l’aggregazione e la sintesi degli interessi, ammettendoli a un’istruttoria procedimentale formale che non ha ovviamente l’obiettivo di favorire la nascita di un neo-corporativismo, ma che porterebbe certamente a una migliore compenetrazione con l’interesse pubblico per costruire una migliore decisione. In una battuta finale: la democrazia esige trasparenza e la trasparenza esige una legge sulle lobbies. Così è se vi pare.   Tommaso Edoardo Frosini - E' stato Ordinario di Diritto pubblico comparato presso la Facoltà di Giurisprudenza dell’Università degli studi di Sassari e attualmente insegna all'Università "Suor Orsola Benincasa" di Napoli. Coordinatore della rivista "Percorsi costituzionali", fa parte del comitato scientifico della rivista "Diritto pubblico comparato ed europeo". Ha pubblicato, tra gli altri, Sovranità popolare e costituzionalismo, Giuffrè 1997, Le votazioni, Laterza 2002, Il presidenzialismo che avanza, Carocci 2009. Fonte: Percorsi Costituzionali 3-2012

Documenti

Intervento del Ministro per le riforme, Sen. Gaetano Quagliariello, in occasione della presentazione dell’ultimo volume della rivista scientifica Percorsi Costituzionali, "Lobby come Democrazia", Giovedì 9 maggio 2013, ore 18.00, Auditorium Gestore Servizi Energetici (GES) - Viale Maresciallo Pilsudski 92 Cari amici, mi dispiace di non aver potuto assistere al dibattito, la convocazione del consiglio dei ministri me lo ha impedito ma c’era da assumere provvedimenti urgenti e importanti. Consentitemi quindi ora, a chiusura di questo incontro, alcune considerazioni con le quali avrei dovuto introdurlo. Comincio innanzi tutto con alcuni ringraziamenti: al presidente Nando Pasquali per aver ospitato la presentazione del nuovo volume di “Percorsi Costituzionali”; al presidente Bassanini e al presidente Parisi per aver accettato di partecipare alla  tavola rotonda introducendo un tema tanto urgente quanto complesso come quello della rappresentanza degli interessi; ancora, ringrazio i numerosi ospiti che hanno animato la discussione, ringrazio tutti i presenti e vorrei infine ringraziare il professor Giuseppe de Vergottini per l’autorevolezza con la quale dirige “Percorsi Costituzionali” e il professor Tommaso Frosini per la dedizione con cui ne coordina l’attività. Il tema oggetto di questo numero è di grande attualità. Se infatti l’esigenza di regolamentare l’attività di rappresentanza degli interessi legittimi nell’ambito dei processi decisionali si è evidenziata soprattutto con la crisi dei partiti politici di stampo novecentesco, tradizionali mediatori degli interessi della società civile presso le istituzioni pubbliche, è nell’ultimo periodo che essa ha assunto un carattere di autentica urgenza. E’ infatti nei periodi di crisi che si impone la necessità di ripensare le linee di politica economica e di regolamentazione settoriale; è nei momenti di stasi dell’economia che tendono a mettersi in moto processi di liberalizzazione e di  apertura alla concorrenza; è quando il barile si è esaurito, e non resta che raschiarne il fondo, che il decisore politico è portato ad ampliare il raggio dei propri interventi, a esercitare una maggiore creatività, ad avventurarsi in settori scarsamente esplorati, a mettere in discussione situazioni consolidate, a toccare "santuari" ritenuti inviolabili. E' in questi momenti che più forte si fa la pressione dei portatori di interessi, non di rado contrastanti tra loro, ma è anche in questi momenti che più proficuo può rivelarsi l’apporto di elementi conoscitivi all’autorità titolare della decisione politica, in funzione dello schema classico “conoscere per deliberare”. Insomma: non solo la rappresentazione degli interessi, laddove ovviamente legittimi, non è da criminalizzare, nella misura in cui il decisore politico sia capace di comporre la pluralità di interessi particolari in un interesse generale. Essa può essere addirittura funzionale a un’attività decisionale consapevole. Ciò che tuttavia in Italia difetta, contribuendo a conferire al concetto di lobby un’accezione negativa e ad alimentare nei confronti delle deliberazioni politiche sospetti di opacità e asservimento a esigenze diverse da quelle della collettività, è una regolamentazione dell’attività dei gruppi di interesse particolare che integrandola nei processi di decisione la renda trasparente. E solo la trasparenza, come segnalato anche dall’OCSE, assicura che tale attività non diventi un mezzo per alterare la concorrenza o per condizionare indebitamente le decisioni. E’ muovendo da questi presupposti che il gruppo di lavoro politico - istituzionale voluto dal presidente Napolitano, del quale ho avuto l’onore di far parte insieme al presidente Violante, al presidente Onida e al ministro Mauro, ha dedicato alle lobbies un capitolo della propria relazione finale, messa a disposizione delle forze politiche come possibile base di partenza per un’opera di legiferazione largamente condivisa. In particolare, il gruppo di lavoro ha proposto l’introduzione di una disciplina che riprenda e integri fra loro i modelli, ampiamente sperimentati, in vigore negli Stati Uniti e presso il Parlamento Europeo. Tale disciplina dovrebbe fondarsi su alcuni assi portanti: L’istituzione di un albo di portatori di interessi presso le assemblee parlamentari e regionali; La previsione, per costoro, di un diritto ad essere ascoltati nell’ambito del l’istruttoria legislativa relativa a provvedimenti che incidono su interessi da loro rappresentati; L’esplicitazione da parte del decisore, nelle relazioni che accompagnano i provvedimenti, delle ragioni della propria scelta, e l’impegno a evitare possibili situazione di conflitto di interessi. Ovviamente, ci tengo a precisarlo, si tratta solo di una proposta fra le tante possibili, sulla quale aprire un dibattito. Ma io intendo porre questo tema fra quelli sui quali intervenire e lo inserirò nello scadenzario delle riforme che a breve presenterò per consentire ai cittadini di vigilare sul rispetto degli impegni assunti. Che il nostro Paese sia maturo per una rivoluzione normativa di questo genere lo testimonia il fatto che, laddove l’attività lobbistica è regolata, il contributo espresso dall’Italia attraverso enti locali, gruppi industriali o finanziari, associazioni di settore, università, stampa e organizzazioni non governative, è connotato da un elevato tasso di dinamismo. E a chi dovesse sostenere che una formalizzazione della rappresentanza degli interessi avvantaggerebbe questi ultimi laddove sono più forti o addirittura dominanti, si potrebbe rispondere il contrario: è proprio l’assenza di una regolamentazione ad avvantaggiare i grandi players, spesso titolari di relazioni dirette con il mondo politico, a discapito di chi, più debole, in un contesto disordinato fatica a rappresentare le proprie istanze. L’auspicio è che in un momento di forte cambiamento, nel quale più forte si fa nei confronti della politica la domanda di trasparenza, la risposta sia all’altezza della sfida. Che non ci si limiti a lanciare qualche osso al cane sempre affamato dell’antipolitica, ma si cavalchi quest’onda per giungere a una reale modernizzazione del nostro sistema democratico e dei processi decisionali in tutti i loro aspetti. Il tema approfondito quest’oggi e sviscerato nell’ultimo volume di “Percorsi Costituzionali” è senz’altro uno di questi, e direi che nella complessità del mondo di oggi si colloca fra i più importanti.

Documenti

Lo scorso ottobre l’I-Com, Istituto per la Competitività, ha pubblicato uno studio sull’introduzione dello smart metering per le misurazioni dei consumi di gas in Italia. Si tratta di una AIR, commissionata dall’Anigas, Associazione nazionale industriali del gas che propone un esercizio alternativo a quello compiuto dall’AEEG nello stesso periodo, sulle stesse tematiche. Partendo da quanto prescrive, a livello europeo, la Direttiva 2006/32/CE in tema di efficienza energetica e innovazioni tecnologiche, l’Anigas ha elaborato uno studio scientifico a sostegno dell’introduzione dello smart metering in Italia. A questo scopo, sono state prese in considerazione le linee guida europee sullo smart metering elaborate dall’ERGEG, la rete europea dei regolatori nel campo dell’energia, che hanno demandato agli Stati membri l’introduzione e la disciplina del meccanismo di misurazione dei consumi caldeggiato dall’Associazione. Ciò che rileva maggiormente dello studio dell’I-Com/Anigas è il suo alto livello di dettaglio e il rigore metodologico. Partendo da un’esaustiva panoramica sulla situazione internazionale in tema di smart grids (reti intelligenti), lo studio si sofferma su sei normative nazionali (Regno Unito, Francia, Irlanda, Spagna, Germania, Austria). Ai fini dell’AIR vera e propria, invece, vengono comparati i costi e benefici dell’opzione di non intervento (definita “Business as usual”) rispetto a due opzioni alternative: quella di “Better billing”, mutuata dal regolatore francese, e quella di “Real time feedback”, ispirata al modello inglese di integrazione fra gas ed elettricità. E l’I-Com sceglie di farlo attraverso un’analisi costi-benefici, realizzata seguendo il modello dell’ESMA, European Smart Metering Alliance (un’associazione di stakeholders europei favorevoli alla diffusione dello smart metering). Come specificato nel documento, le principali fonti di dati utilizzate nell’indagine sono rappresentate da un questionario somministrato nel bimestre giugno-luglio 2011 ad alcune associazioni di settore (Anigas, Assogas, Federestrattiva e Federutility), nonché dalle banche dati ufficiali prodotte negli ultimi due anni a livello internazionale. La somministrazione del questionario a categorie trasversali di interessati testimonia anche una certa attenzione per le consultazioni, anche se su questo aspetto è indubbio che vi siano dei margini di miglioramento. L’AIR dell’Anigas sullo smart metering, che si conclude con un’opzione per il modello à la française del “better billing”, non offre soltanto uno studio sulle condizioni e sugli scenari dello smart metering nel mercato del gas, ma anche, e forse soprattutto, uno spunto di riflessione sul ruolo degli strumenti di qualità della regolazione e sulla percezione delle loro potenzialità da parte degli stakeholders. Fare lobbying presso il regolatore, studi e analisi ex ante alla mano, perché adotti una data normativa, inizia forse a rappresentare uno strumento più convincente anche per i gruppi di interesse, nell’ambito di decisioni regolatorie pubbliche in cui si tende sempre più ad enfatizzare il ruolo delle valutazioni tecniche.Federica Cacciatore - Osservatorio AIR

Documenti

E' molto probabile – come dice Fabio Bistoncini, fondatore e partner di FB e Associati, autore di un’autobiografia professionale intitolata Vent’anni da sporco lobbista (Guerini e associati) – che la causa dell’accentuato attivismo dei lobbisti sia la presenza di un governo che decide e non tanto quella di un governo di tecnici. I lobbisti affollano le anticamere del senato perché c’è un governo che decide tante cose in tempi ristretti e che ha presentato un dispositivo con quasi cento articoli e un numero ancora maggiore di soggetti coinvolti. E non perché c’è un governo tecnico che, non avendo ministri espressioni di partiti, non gode della capacità di filtro che questi possono rappresentare. Resta il fatto comunque che, a fronte di una riduzione del ruolo e della reputazione dei partiti, la società italiana, i suoi processi decisionali pubblici, sembrano più affollati di rappresentanti professionali di interessi organizzati, appunto i lobbisti. C’è un legame tra l’indebolimento delle forme tradizionali della rappresentanza e l’ascesa, più o meno resistibile, di nuovi soggetti della mediazione sociale? Parliamo di un indebolimento che non tocca solo i partiti politici ma anche le altre forme di rappresentanza: dai sindacati dei lavoratori a quelli delle categorie “datoriali” industriali, commercianti, artigiani, coltivatori. Sono alcune decine d’anni che, in Italia, le forme della rappresentanza collettiva sono sotto una forte tensione che ha contribuito a mettere in crisi i vecchi assetti ma non a farne nascere nuovi e stabili. Chiariamo però subito che per lobbismo si intende una rappresentanza di interessi svolta in modo trasparente, cioè dichiarato e, aggiungerei, fatturato come attività professionale. Il faccendiere, il mediatore di scambi di favore, il corruttore, figure certo presenti all’ombra di tutti i palazzi della decisione politica e pubblica, mettono in atto comportamenti illeciti e illegali che non meritano di essere chiamati lobby. Torniamo ai lobbisti, quelli veri. Quelli professionali. Ce ne sono davvero di più? Assistiamo davvero al consolidarsi di una nuova professionalità? Certamente sì. E, quindi, è urgente e opportuna un’agile e semplice regolamentazione che ne renda riconoscibili e tracciabili sia la presenza sia il comportamento. Il lobbismo deve essere riconosciuto come una delle modalità attraverso le quali emerge la dinamica degli interessi in una società dove, non solo la complessità cresce, ma dove questa si sviluppa esponenzialmente per le migliaia di interrelazioni che connettono i molteplici campi di attività e quindi, anche, gli interessi. Da un lato, complessità e articolazione sociale sono già molto cresciute e si svilupperanno ancora di più nei prossimi anni. Dall’altro, le forme della rappresentanza degli interessi si sono sclerotizzate in apparati burocratici che si autoperpetuano in ambiti non competitivi. Questo rappresenterà sempre più una camicia di forza per una società che non accetta più di essere contenuta in logiche verticistiche e centralistiche. È un aspetto del faticoso cammino dalla società corporativa, statalista, paternalistica alla società liberalizzata che oggi sembra avanzare più per la necessità imposta dalla crisi che per la capacità del sistema politico. La presenza dei lobbisti quindi è un ulteriore segnale di processi di cambiamento di lunga durata che non accettano di essere inquadrati in vecchie e costose strutture burocratiche, ma che vanno governati con grande capacità adattativa, con regole chiare, procedure snelle e con un grande atteggiamento di fiducia nella capacità della società di trovare le proprie forme di autoregolamentazione. Quindi la maggiore presenza dei lobbisti è una testimonianza della più generale trasformazione del sistema della rappresentanza ed è anche un’ulteriore sfida per il ruolo dei partiti. Lobbisti professionalmente validi che agiscono in modo riconoscibile e trasparente possono agevolare il confronto, la competizione, il conflitto tra gli interessi in gioco e possono contribuire all’individuazione delle migliori decisioni possibili. Di fronte a queste nuove professionalità vanno ridefinite anche quelle degli attori politici, dei “deputati a rappresentare” e di conseguenza quella dei partiti. Ha certo ragione Ilvo Diamanti a non credere che possa esistere una democrazia senza partiti ma, sicuramente, come c’è democrazia e democrazia, ci sono molti modi diversi di organizzare i partiti. Forse oggi sotto la spinta di fenomeni sociali forti che mettono in atto nuove forme di rappresentanza sarebbe il caso di entrare nel merito e dire come organizzare i partiti adatti al nostro tempo. Come, ad esempio, affrontare almeno alcuni dei problemi sui quali si sta mostrando la corda: contendibilità della leadership, accountability economica e politica dei gruppi dirigenti, ruolo degli elettori per riequilibrare le spinte spontanee alle chiusure oligarchiche, rapporto iscritti eletti, rapporto tra strutture di partito e istituzioni. Aspettare ancora potrebbe significare che presto qualche gruppo sociale penserà di rivolgersi ai lobbysti piuttosto che ai partiti.Prof. Mario Rodriguez - Europa Quotidiano

Documenti

"Per il bene della democrazia italiana serve con urgenza una regolamentazione pubblica della professione lobbistica". Lo sostiene Civiltà Cattolica, che nel nuovo numero dedica un articolo al "lobbying", alla sua "utilità", e alla "necessaria regolamentazione" sia per combattere la corruzione che "la mediatizzazione farsesca della politica". Scarica l'articolo di Civiltà Cattolica in .pdf La rivista dei Gesuiti, le cui bozze di norme vengono riviste dalla Segreteria di Stato vaticana, ricorda che secondo l'ong tedesca Transparency International, "su 182 Paesi, l'Italia è al 69/o posto nella lotta contro la corruzione, che è alimentata dall'elevata evasione fiscale". "Riteniamo che, contro la corruzione e per la crescita morale ed economica del Paese, occorra anche una regolamentazione chiara e organica del 'lobbying' da parte del Parlamento italiano o del Governo", scrive l'autore dell'articolo, padre Luciano Larivera. Secondo Civiltà Cattolica, "i faccendieri vanno messi alle strette. Ma non serve criminalizzare culturalmente i lobbisti. Quelli validi vanno protetti legalmente, certificandone la professionalità, l'onestà e la trasparenza. Occorre una normativa chiara e organica sul 'lobbying', anche perché alcune Regioni hanno varato già le loro regole". Una legge italiana sul 'lobbying' "darebbe un contributo significativo per contrastare non soltanto la corruzione, ma anche la 'teatrocrazia' (la mediatizzazione farsesca della politica da parte di incompetenti o peggio)": due fenomeni che, secondo i Gesuiti di Civiltà Cattolica, "fanno degenerare la democrazia partecipativa, perché alimentano la sfiducia nelle istituzioni, l'anti-politica e l'individualismo. Di conseguenza si crea spazio per cricche, caste e clientele oscure, che fanno i loro affari e si consolidano spartendosi il bottino e le cariche". Invece, "in una battaglia anche culturale per la trasparenza", sarebbe importante "ad esempio dotare i lobbisti italiani di un badge di riconoscimento quando operano nei luoghi del potere, e di spazi appositi in Camera e Senato per incontrare i parlamentari". Vatican Insider - La Stampa

Documenti

(voce inglese, dal latino medievale lobia, loggia, portico; dalla metà del XVI secolo ha il significato di 'passaggio', 'corridoio'; in tedesco, Laube, portico).  Il significato attuale  -   'gruppo di pressione', 'gruppo di interesse'  -  nasce dal fatto che lobby è anche la grande anticamera nella Camera dei Comuni, a Londra, dove i rappresentanti degli interessi sociali  -  i lobbisti  -  fino dalla prima metà del XIX secolo prendevano contatto con i deputati, per rendere note a essi le esigenze e le richieste dei loro mandanti. Oggi negli Usa il lobbismo, ossia il rappresentare interessi sociali davanti ai parlamentari, è del tutto ufficiale e pubblico.  Al contrario, negli ambiti politici continentali, dove la rappresentanza politica si legittima attraverso il bene comune, o la volontà della nazione, il lobbismo  -  pur diffusissimo  -  è informale, non ufficiale e non trasparente. Se infatti è in linea di principio ammissibile che un parlamentare venga a contatto con pezzi della società civile, per conoscerne le esigenze, è anche evidente che non può essere il portavoce diretto di interessi particolari, perché il suo compito è precisamente legiferare avendo come obiettivo l'interesse generale. Il passaggio di denaro, poi, dal lobbista al politico, è sempre illecito, e in sospetto di corruzione. L'esistenza di interessi particolari è strutturale nella società. Questi interessi possono farsi valere sulla scena politica attraverso i partiti, che nei loro programmi fanno riferimento abbastanza chiaro a ceti o a gruppi  -  anche quando, come avviene oggi, i partiti sono largamente post-ideologici e post-classisti  - . Gli interessi, in questa ipotesi, si affacciano sulla scena pubblica attraverso il processo elettorale, i partiti, il parlamento; dove, peraltro, devono sforzarsi di assumere un valore generale, di acquisire una piena legittimità politica attraverso un processo di confronto aperto e pubblico. Quello che gli interessi particolari non possono fare  -  e dovrebbero in ogni caso non trovare ascolto  -  è chiedere e ottenere, dal ceto politico, specifiche esenzioni da obblighi, o specifiche conferme di privilegi, o specifiche omissioni di intervento legislativo. In tal modo si assiste a una sorta di 'trionfo del particolare', che lede sia l'autonomia della politica sia l'uguaglianza dei cittadini: se la politica è fatta dalle lobbies, infatti, è più che probabile che vincano sempre i più forti, i più ricchi, i più influenti. La lobby dei farmacisti  (solo per fare un esempio fra i mille possibili) prevarrà sempre su quella dei pensionati. Tramontata da molti decenni l'ipotesi corporativa  -  che consisteva nel dare rilievo pubblico  e giuridico agli interessi sociali organizzati, all'interno di uno Stato autoritario  - , la crisi del modello liberaldemocratico, che prevede una forte e decisa mediazione dei partiti e del parlamento, porta di fatto l'anticamera a prevalere sulla Camera, la politica di corridoio a sostituire quella dell'aula. Oggi, così,  le lobbies sono più forti e influenti che mai, e hanno abbastanza potere per impedire riforme sgradite agli interessi più forti, o più diffusi, bloccando di fatto la società (e le sue energie) in una miriade di privilegi grandi e piccoli, che non si limitano a  danneggiare il cittadino in quanto consumatore ma impoveriscono anche la politica e la sfera pubblica in generale, trasformandola in una giungla in cui vige la legge del più forte e nessuno è vincolato a un orizzonte generale. Questa vittoria del privato sul pubblico, in ogni caso, è frutto di scarsa lungimiranza. Un Paese senza politica, composto da gruppi che si comportano come free rider e tendono a spostare il peso della politica sulle spalle altrui, in un 'si salvi chi può' permanente,  è infatti intrinsecamente a rischio. E, se crolla, trascina alla rovina anche gli interessi particolari delle lobbies oggi trionfanti. E non si salva nessuno.   Fonte: La Repubblica

Documenti

(voce inglese, dal latino medievale lobia, loggia, portico; dalla metà del XVI secolo ha il significato di 'passaggio', 'corridoio'; in tedesco, Laube, portico). Il significato attuale - 'gruppo di pressione', 'gruppo di interesse' - nasce dal fatto che lobby è anche la grande anticamera nella Camera dei Comuni, a Londra, dove i rappresentanti degli interessi sociali - i lobbisti - fino dalla prima metà del XIX secolo prendevano contatto con i deputati, per rendere note a essi le esigenze e le richieste dei loro mandanti. Oggi negli Usa il lobbismo, ossia il rappresentare interessi sociali davanti ai parlamentari, è del tutto ufficiale e pubblico. Al contrario, negli ambiti politici continentali, dove la rappresentanza politica si legittima attraverso il bene comune, o la volontà della nazione, il lobbismo - pur diffusissimo - è informale, non ufficiale e non trasparente. Se infatti è in linea di principio ammissibile che un parlamentare venga a contatto con pezzi della società civile, per conoscerne le esigenze, è anche evidente che non può essere il portavoce diretto di interessi particolari, perché il suo compito è precisamente legiferare avendo come obiettivo l'interesse generale. Il passaggio di denaro, poi, dal lobbista al politico, è sempre illecito, e in sospetto di corruzione. L'esistenza di interessi particolari è strutturale nella società. Questi interessi possono farsi valere sulla scena politica attraverso i partiti, che nei loro programmi fanno riferimento abbastanza chiaro a ceti o a gruppi - anche quando, come avviene oggi, i partiti sono largamente post-ideologici e post-classisti - . Gli interessi, in questa ipotesi, si affacciano sulla scena pubblica attraverso il processo elettorale, i partiti, il parlamento; dove, peraltro, devono sforzarsi di assumere un valore generale, di acquisire una piena legittimità politica attraverso un processo di confronto aperto e pubblico. Quello che gli interessi particolari non possono fare - e dovrebbero in ogni caso non trovare ascolto - è chiedere e ottenere, dal ceto politico, specifiche esenzioni da obblighi, o specifiche conferme di privilegi, o specifiche omissioni di intervento legislativo. In tal modo si assiste a una sorta di 'trionfo del particolare', che lede sia l'autonomia della politica sia l'uguaglianza dei cittadini: se la politica è fatta dalle lobbies, infatti, è più che probabile che vincano sempre i più forti, i più ricchi, i più influenti. La lobby dei farmacisti (solo per fare un esempio fra i mille possibili) prevarrà sempre su quella dei pensionati. Tramontata da molti decenni l'ipotesi corporativa - che consisteva nel dare rilievo pubblico e giuridico agli interessi sociali organizzati, all'interno di uno Stato autoritario - , la crisi del modello liberaldemocratico, che prevede una forte e decisa mediazione dei partiti e del parlamento, porta di fatto l'anticamera a prevalere sulla Camera, la politica di corridoio a sostituire quella dell'aula. Oggi, così, le lobbies sono più forti e influenti che mai, e hanno abbastanza potere per impedire riforme sgradite agli interessi più forti, o più diffusi, bloccando di fatto la società (e le sue energie) in una miriade di privilegi grandi e piccoli, che non si limitano a danneggiare il cittadino in quanto consumatore ma impoveriscono anche la politica e la sfera pubblica in generale, trasformandola in una giungla in cui vige la legge del più forte e nessuno è vincolato a un orizzonte generale. Questa vittoria del privato sul pubblico, in ogni caso, è frutto di scarsa lungimiranza. Un Paese senza politica, composto da gruppi che si comportano come free rider e tendono a spostare il peso della politica sulle spalle altrui, in un 'si salvi chi può' permanente, è infatti intrinsecamente a rischio. E, se crolla, trascina alla rovina anche gli interessi particolari delle lobbies oggi trionfanti. E non si salva nessuno.Carlo Galli - La Repubblica

Documenti

Lo sostiene Pier Luigi Petrillo, professore aggregato di diritto pubblico comparato presso Unitelma Sapienza – Università di Roma e docente di tecniche di lobbying alla Luiss Guido Carli, nel Focus “Lobbies. Le norme ci sono, basterebbe applicarle” (PDF). Scrive Petrillo: “pur nell’assenza di uno specifico codice di condotta o codice deontologico per chi è chiamato ad assolvere il mandato parlamentare, è possibile rintracciare nell’ordinamento disposizioni che definiscono norme comportamentali minimali per deputati e senatori”, così come esistono forme di regolamentazione dell’attività stessa di lobbying. Tuttavia, prosegue Petrillo, “Tale complesso di norme, introdotte e aggirate, definiscono un “modello” regolatorio di tipo strisciante ad andamento schizofrenico poiché è tipico di questa nevrosi il dichiarare di volersi comportare in un certo modo e poi fare l’esatto opposto... Stando così le cose, il rapporto tra gli organi costituzionali e le componenti del sistema politico che ne influenzano l’indirizzo (le lobbies, appunto) è avvolto da un velo impenetrabile di oscurità: il luogo della decisione, lungi dall’avere pareti di vetro, ricorda una brasserie ottocentesca, piena di fumo e cattivo odore, dove, pur entrandovi, si fatica a distinguere le persone, le voci, i movimenti”. In conclusione, “se queste regole fossero applicate, resterebbe la sola necessità di far emergere i portatori di interessi oscuri, magari prevedendo un registro degli stessi e vincolando l’esercizio del lobbying all’iscrizione”. Il Focus di Pier Luigi Petrillo, “Lobbies. Le norme ci sono, basterebbe applicarle”, è liberamente scaricabile qui: (PDF).Pier Luigi Petrillo - IBL

Documenti

La premessa. Nel corso degli ultimi venti anni si è assistito ad una modificazione sostanziale della figura del lobbista nel nostro Paese. Se ancora oggi i media trattano lʼargomento utilizzando spesso stereotipi consolidati che distorcono la funzione e lʼattività di relazione con le Istituzioni, al contrario le organizzazioni complesse (di qualsiasi natura: dalle aziende alle ONG alle associazioni imprenditoriali) hanno sviluppato la consapevolezza che il lobbying rappresenta una leva strategica necessaria per raggiungere i propri obiettivi. Da qui la nascita di un vero e proprio mercato competitivo e la definizione di figure professionali in grado di svolgere diverse funzioni. Una professione che è ancora in profonda evoluzione. La secolarizzazione della società, la disintermediazione della partecipazione, la moltiplicazione dei centri decisionali, la complessità delle decisioni pubbliche, il proliferare dei gruppi di interesse che intendono influenzare il decisore: sono tra le tante dinamiche evolutive che stanno modificando lo scenario di riferimento. Scarica l'intervento completo in .pdfFabio Bistoncini - FB & Associati

Documenti

LOBBYINGITALIA
NEWS